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Old Melodies ...

Old Melodies ...

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Sha Na Na (Rock'n Roll is Here to Stay) LP 1969

Posted: 15 Sep 2019 01:52 PM PDT
https://allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com/2019/09/sha-na-na-rockn-roll-is-here-to-stay-lp.html






In the mid-1970s, when '50s nostalgia was all the rage, rock-&-roll
revivalists Sha Na Na (who had formed in the '60s, and performed at
Woodstock) reached their peak, even landing their own TV show, but their
reputation was made on records like the ones compiled on this twofer.
Containing Sha Na Na's first two albums, this release is full of '50s doo
wop and rock-&-roll classics given reverential but energetic updates,
making them seem fresh and vital for the new generation and keeping that
crucial sense of fun intact.
Enjoy.
"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

Big Ty to Rock And Roll Archives For This Share.
@

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The Peanuts ヒットパレード (The Hit Parade) (1960)

Posted: 15 Sep 2019 12:24 PM PDT
https://allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com/2019/09/the-peanuts-hit-parade-1960.html






The Peanuts (ザ・ピーナッツ Za Pīnattsu) were a Japanese vocal group
consisting of twin sisters Emi Itō (伊藤エミ, Itō Emi) and Yumi Itō (伊藤ユ
ミ, Itō Yumi). They were born in Nagoya, Japan in January 1941. Their
uniqueness was their being monozygotic twins, with voices only slightly
apart in timbre which resulted in their singing together sounding like a
solo artist using double tracking or reverb).While still in high school,
the twins were discovered by a talent scout while performing at a night
club and were brought to Tokyo where they became the first clients for
Watanabe Productions. In 1959, the Peanuts became a hit at the Nichigeki
theater. That same year, they released their first recording, Kawaii Hana
("Cute Flower"). In their early years they sang Japanese covers of
standards, foreign hits, and Japanese folk songs; then they began singing
originals, written by their producer, Hiroshi Miyagawa, and such
songwriters as Koichi Sugiyama and Rei Nakanishi. They were the first to
perform "Koi no Vacance".
Later, the twins embarked on a brief acting career, appearing as Mothra's
twin fairies, known as the Shobijin, in the 1961 film Mothra, and the 1964
films Mothra vs. Godzilla and Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster. In the
audio commentary for the DVD of Mothra vs. Godzilla, it is noted that
director Ishirō Honda fondly recalled the Itos' professionalism. Though not
primarily actresses by trade, they were surprisingly skilled, learned their
lines quickly, and always worked on time, despite their own busy schedules.
While the Peanuts were born identical twins, Emi had a mole near her left
eye. To preserve their identical twin image, Yumi would have a mole drawn
near her left eye.They appeared in the United States on The Ed Sullivan
Show on April 3, 1966, performing "Lover Come Back to Me".
Unusual for Japanese singers at the time, the duo had success in Germany,
as well as in Austria. In 1963 Caterina Valente was in Japan where the duo
caught her attention. Valente invited them to Germany. On the occasion of
the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Michael Pfleghar produced the opening
ceremonies, where both were also invited, and the musical director Heinz
Kiessling produced German-language recordings with them,
including "Souvenirs from Tokyo". In 1965, Pfleghar cast them in two other
shows "The Smile in the West" and "Schlager-Festspiele". In total, they
released eight singles in the German language between 1964 and 1967. In
1965 "Souvenirs from Tokyo" reached No. 18 on the Austrian charts and spent
2 weeks at No. 40 on the German Billboard charts. In 1967 "Bye, Bye
Yokohama" spent 4 weeks on the Germany charts, rising to No. 30. In 1966,
the duo also performed at the Olympia in Paris.
The pair retired from performing in 1975 after Emi married fellow Nabepro
star Kenji Sawada. The duo is remembered most for its versions of European
songs and for a handful of Japanese pop songs, such as "Furimukanaide"
("Don't Turn Around").
Emi Itō died on June 15, 2012, at the age of 71. Yumi died on May 18, 2016,
at the age of 75.

RIP
"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"
@

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